The wearing of fabric head coverings in worship was universally the practice of Christian women until the twentieth century. What happened? Did we suddenly find some biblical truth to which the saints for thousands of years were blind? Or were our biblical views of women gradually eroded by the modern feminist movement that has infiltrated the Church...? - R.C. Sproul

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Covering Testimony: Kim Fox

Name: Kim FoxAge: 32Location: Brighton, COStarted Covering: December 2012

1) Introduce yourself to our readers.

Hi! My name is Kim Fox. I am a wife to my high-school sweetheart and mother to six living children and counting- aged 8 and under! (five daughters and one son, and two children in heaven) God redeemed me and called me to salvation when I was 19. My husband and I were baptized together a couple years later. I am a busy keeper of my home, and school my children at home. I am also a sporadic blogger at www.foxliving.com. The Lord continues to grow our faith and led us to a reformed church about 7 years ago.

2) Where do you attend church? Tell us a little bit about it.

I attend Westminster Reformed Presbyterian Church. It is a congregation of the Reformed Presbyterian Church of North America (RPCNA). Our spiritual heritage particularly comes from the reformation in Scotland and the Scottish Covenanters. Our full doctrinal statement is found in the Westminster Confession of Faith, The Larger and Shorter Catechisms, and the Reformed Presbyterian Testimony. We have recently moved and our church membership still resides in a congregation of the Orthodox Presbyterian Church in Oviedo, Florida. Read more

How to Talk about Head Covering on Your Church Web Site

Churches that practice head covering are a minority in the Western World. Those who are visiting these churches for the first time will immediately notice the distinction between men and women and many will wonder (especially those who are not Christians) what it means. On many church websites there are sections for frequently asked questions, beliefs and/or a page telling visitors what they can expect when visiting. We’d like to share some examples of church websites that do mention head covering and how they introduce the topic to potential visitors. Read more