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Covering the Web: Edition #2

Covering The Web

“Covering the Web” is where we shine the spotlight on content about head covering or complementarianism that we did not produce ourselves. Each edition includes articles, videos, photos, as well as e-book deals relevant to our movement’s mission. Links are not endorsements.

  • MUST READ: 5 Myths about Complementarianism (Crossway)
    “In what follows, we’ll highlight three myths imposed onto complementarianism from the outside (i.e. by egalitarians), plus two myths sometimes perpetuated by those on the inside (i.e. complementarians themselves who mistakenly push the boundaries of God’s design, perhaps to accommodate the culture).”
  • Play The Man (Desiring God)
    “Therefore, Christians, of all people, need to be clear that brutality, passivity, complacency, and effeminacy miss the mark of manhood. Jesus Christ did not domineer, live disinterestedly, or act like a woman — and he is the model of God-honoring masculinity. But the inclusion of effeminacy in that list may prick some sensibilities today.”
  • My Winter Style (Up North Mama)
    During December 2018 I participated in the Dressember challenge. The event raises awareness for human trafficking and the sex slavery trade. To participate you are required to wear a dress for the entire month of December. Not a problem! I love dresses and had already transitioned to wearing mostly dresses (I occasionally wear a long tunic with thick leggings). Here are some of my looks from December.

The following are a list of limited time e-book deals which are on the topic of biblical manhood and womanhood. If you don’t have a Kindle device, you can install their free reading app on your computer, phone, or tablet. Prices may vary per region.


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Re-post • @deanlobs1 – I favor head covering for Christian women. Just do. It is not an easy sell in our culture.

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Found an interesting link about head covering or biblical manhood/womanhood? Tell us about it here.

March 2019 Posting Schedule

March 2019 Posting Calendar

Head Covering and the Regulative Principle of Worship

Head Covering and the Regulative Principle of Worship
Editor’s Note: The Head Covering Movement team is made up of men and women from various denominations and does not endorse a specific style or form of worship as a core tenet of HCM. This article is intended to describe a worship philosophy that arose during the Protestant Reformation, which is helpful to consider as it challenges us to rely on Scripture as our guide for all of life and helps us to see why the practice of head covering is appropriate for Christian worship everywhere.

Imagine you were given the opportunity to meet the Queen of England. It’s likely you wouldn’t wing it, arriving in your favorite comfy outfit to share some personal stories about your family dog. Instead, you’d probably study to find out what you are supposed to do when you were in her presence. Likewise, we should be thoughtful as to how we enter God’s presence in worship as a church body. During the Protestant Reformation (roughly 1517-1648), one of five key doctrines to emerge was sola scriptura, which is Latin for “Scripture alone.” This means that the Bible is our source of truth and provides our only infallible rule of faith and practice. This doctrine guards against elevating church tradition, personal experience, or reason to an equal level of authority with God’s revealed will in the Bible.

Scripture Guides Us

A primary purpose of God’s Word is the self-disclosure of Himself to His people. This includes how we are to worship Him with our lives, and how we worship Him in corporate worship—our time gathered with other believers on the Lord’s Day. Two primary schools of thought emerged during the Reformation: the earliest Protestant reformer, Martin Luther, applied sola scriptura to worship by saying that anything which may be edifying is permissible in gathered worship if it is not forbidden in Scripture: “I condemn no ceremony except such as are opposed to the gospel; all the rest I leave intact within the church.” 1) Tanner, Craig. “NPW vs. RPW.” Avoiding Evil, 2004, http://www.tbcsullivan.com/avoidingevil/2004/03/05/npw-vs-rpw/. This became known as the “Normative Principle of Worship” and is the prevailing approach to corporate worship in North American churches. Essentially it states that Scripture makes clear things we should not do in worship; that is, we should avoid anything obviously sinful. Many faithful Christians adhere to this worship philosophy, seeking to legitimately honor God’s Word in their worship by not violating God’s commands during their times of gathered worship.

However, another view became much more widely held among the “Reformed” (Protestant non-Lutheran) groups. It was eventually known as the Regulative Principle of Worship (RPW). This concept also applied sola scriptura, but instead of asking what we may do in gathered worship, it states Scripture is sufficient to tell us what we should do in worship. This principle states that God, through His Word, commands certain distinct elements for corporate worship, such as singing, praying, and preaching. 2) The key elements of corporate worship laid out in God’s Word are reading the Bible (1 Tim. 4:13); preaching the Bible (2 Tim. 4:2); singing the Bible (Eph. 5:19; Col. 3:16) — Psalms and other songs that accurately reflect the teaching of Scripture; prayer (Matt. 21:13), and administration of the two sacraments: baptism and the Lord’s Supper (Matt. 28:19; Acts 2:38–39; 1 Cor. 11:23–26). Some would also include a few other elements like taking offerings (1 Cor 16:2) and installing church officers (Acts 6:1-6). The above biblically-prescribed church service elements are clearly spelled out within many of Christianity’s historical creeds. Any additional elements not found in Scripture must be left out. (Full disclosure: I, the writer of this article, subscribe to this view.) There may be some variation in how the elements are executed (sermon length, number of songs, etc.), but the actual service components are those which are prescribed in Scripture.

The basis for this principle is that God is perfect, holy, and transcendent beyond our imagining; we are redeemed-yet-flawed created beings and cannot rightly come up with how we ought to enter His presence in worship. Instead, we must worship God together on His terms, according to His guidelines made known in His Word especially through Jesus’ teachings, the apostles’ writings, and New Testament church practice carried out under apostolic oversight. The Regulative Principle emphasizes that we must not add to or take away from God’s Word 3) Deut. 4:2, Deut. 12:32, Rev. 22:18-19. and “that worship is of God, by God, and for God.” 4) Hyde, Daniel. “What Is the Regulative Principle of Worship?” Ligonier, 2017, https://www.ligonier.org/blog/what-regulative-principle-worship/. Read more

References

1.
  Tanner, Craig. “NPW vs. RPW.” Avoiding Evil, 2004, http://www.tbcsullivan.com/avoidingevil/2004/03/05/npw-vs-rpw/.
2.
 The key elements of corporate worship laid out in God’s Word are reading the Bible (1 Tim. 4:13); preaching the Bible (2 Tim. 4:2); singing the Bible (Eph. 5:19; Col. 3:16) — Psalms and other songs that accurately reflect the teaching of Scripture; prayer (Matt. 21:13), and administration of the two sacraments: baptism and the Lord’s Supper (Matt. 28:19; Acts 2:38–39; 1 Cor. 11:23–26). Some would also include a few other elements like taking offerings (1 Cor 16:2) and installing church officers (Acts 6:1-6). The above biblically-prescribed church service elements are clearly spelled out within many of Christianity’s historical creeds.
4.
 Hyde, Daniel. “What Is the Regulative Principle of Worship?” Ligonier, 2017, https://www.ligonier.org/blog/what-regulative-principle-worship/.

Bruce Waltke Quote Image #1 (Redesign)

Bruce Waltke Quote Image #1 (Redesign)

Source: Bruce K. Waltke – 1 Corinthians 11:2-16: An Interpretation (BSAC 135:537, Jan 1978)

Real Christianity #33: Should Christian Women Wear A Head Covering While Praying or Prophesying?

Throughout church history, we see Christian men taking their hats off during prayer and Christian women putting hats (veils, bonnets, etc) on during prayer. The practice is derived from Paul’s first letting to the Corinthians and is found in the opening text of chapter eleven. However, in the modern church, this practice is kept by the men but not by the women. In this episode, Dale and Veronica Patridge look at this passage to understand what it’s truly instructing.

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