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Is Headcovering a Distraction from the Gospel?

Are people who are passionate about headcovering “majoring in the minors” and is a movement dedicated to restoring this symbol a distraction from more important things? In this video we deal with this objection head-on.

This video is based off an article found here.

Jeremy Gardiner

Jeremy is the founder of the Head Covering Movement and the author of Head Covering: A Forgotten Christian Practice for Modern Times. He is a member of Fellowship Baptist Church and a student at Moody Bible Institute. He lives in Alberta, Canada with his wife and five young children. Jeremy is also the founder and operator of Gospel eBooks, a popular website that provides alerts for free and discounted Christian e-books.

Latest posts by Jeremy Gardiner (see all)

Comments

Deborah F.
Reply

In my opinion, the fact that this passage continues to prick the consciences of many women in the church even today, contradicts his assertion that this is “baby stuff.” Those of us who stumble upon and eventually follow your movement, such as myself, are desperately searching for a fair and balanced debate! You’re providing a valuable service to us, and we thank you for it!

Furthermore, many of us who become convicted to cover do so as a testimony to the Gospel at work in our hearts.

Kinuko H
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Jeremy, bravo! Very well said. Your are fighting a good fight (II Tim 4:7) like Paul. I am impressed!

Stephanie S.
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I almost spit my coffee on my computer screen while watching the beginning clip, LOL! I was so surprised and had no clue where this one was going. Bold choice, my friend, bold choice. This was excellent and such a great reminder for us that it is all about Jesus Christ. Covering, while a minor command, is worth exploring the Scripture and examining your heart on because once you have considered it you can move forward with making much of Jesus Christ. I don’t intend to sit around debating whether or not to cover or trying to encourage or dissuade the women around me. I just cover and love Jesus. The way I look at it is, say worst case scenario, God only intended the Corinthian women to cover, than what harm am I doing by covering? I believe that there will be no loss. However, what if by not covering I have consciously or unconsciously grieved the Lord? What if by not covering I am giving God a willful symbol of my own authority? I can’t find peace there, so I cover. Through covering, I’ve come to find a real joy in being able to present myself as a woman who submits herself to both her husband and God before men and angels. What a powerful physical reminder on Sunday morning as I walk into church that I am playing a part in the display of God’s wonderfully created order to angels! How awesome is God that He would make a display of such a broken and messed up person? Yet, that is the God I serve! He takes someone unworthy to be in His presence and calls them His child.

Jamie Carter
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“It seemed good to the Holy Spirit and to us not to burden you with anything beyond the following requirements: You are to abstain from food sacrificed to idols, from blood, from the meat of strangled animals and from sexual immorality. You will do well to avoid these things. Farewell.” – Acts 15:28-29

Isn’t it an impossible task to keep all of the commanments in Scripture? The error of the pharisees was beeing too scrupulous with the OT, and we were warned that it’s possible to make the same mistakes in the NT – ‘beware the yeast of the Pharisee, which is hypocrisy’. I’ve been to a church where you had to jump through a series of hoops to prove you loved God, you had do everything exactly the right way. I failed to measure up to all of their standards and I thought that God hated me for it. (For whatever God does not love, He hates.) It took me a long time to see that the church had twisted scripture using that very verse to control what I thought, how I spoke, how I believed, and what I did. I hope that I’m right in that God loves me anyway because I really tried and that has to count for something.

Jeremy Gardiner
Reply

Hi Jamie, thanks for the comment. I think tying our obedience to God’s love for us is a distortion of the Christian message. As John 14:15 says, our obedience is a tangible way to show our love towards Christ (not the other way around). Rest in Christ, knowing that His love for you isn’t based on what you have or haven’t done (God loves you because of Jesus) but then out of love towards Him, follow Him and what He says. You and I will not be able to obey perfectly, but we still should be striving to and repenting when we fail. All the while, keeping the mindset that our obedience or failure isn’t what makes (or keeps) us right with God.

Jamie Carter
Reply

One person once described it this way to me: If you expend all your effort relying on your own ability to obey to save you, then you are still relying on yourself. But if you love Jesus, he will enable you and he will help you and that’s more hopeful because it puts the focus on him. The Pharisees relied on their own understanding and their own efforts and they were not rewarded for their obedience but scolded for their disobedience. I just thank God that we don’t have to follow as nearly commandments as they taught existed.

Sarah
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Hello, I just came across this site last week & am considering starting to cover my head during prayer. But how does this fit with 1 Thessalonians 5:17 which says to pray without ceasing? If we are to cover our heads during prayer, yet pray without ceasing, wouldn’t that mean that women are to have their heads covered all the time? I am not trying to argue, but am just curious. Personally, I know that I pray throughout my day. Since God is always with me, He is just a prayer away. So then do these two verses together suggest continual head covering rather than situational covering? Would love to know your thoughts. Thanks!

Christian Filbrun
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Sarah, you will a difference in thought among us on whether the headship covering/veiling is for worship times only, any time you pray/prophesy, or more or less all the time. I would encourage you to read through the link Jeremy posted below. And not for the sake of argument (the charity displayed here has been impressive thus far, fyi), but just to give you an idea where some of us who are convicted that veiling is for times beyond public worship or just prayer/prophesy, you might read my comment in the discussion under the post. It’s a bit long to repost here, lol. God bless you as you continue to seek His will for you in this area.

Olivia Stocum
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Thank you for debating this with such a joyful spirit. All too often, Christians just flat out attack each other. I really appreciate the peaceful way these videos are presented.

Rob Brown
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Your hair is a distraction lol.

cokers4life
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Head covering opens up a huge can of worms in my mind. Now that I am head covering, i find myself with questions about all those other verses about women written by Paul. I find head covering as that easier topic to cover that leads one to examine the more difficult issues. It’s like if one can examine head covering and determine its relevance today, then it is easier to confront the other teachings like women being silent and not teaching and a young woman’s main focus being governor of the home and then elder women being able to teach. I know you are only confronting head covering, but you are opening up a can of worms. Where can one get clarity on these other related issues? Should I talk in a mixed bible study at church where everyone is discussing? If a husband asks a wife about the bible, should a wife teach him? It’s not like we are living in an ideal world filled with ideal churches with ideal families. Should young married women even be involved ministering in the church in any capacity other than maybe nursery? I ask honestly. I don’t know. Maybe they are dumb questions.

Jeremy Gardiner
Reply

They are definitely not dumb questions. I’m really glad to hear you are asking them.

I’d start with this sermon by David Platt called “Biblical Manhood and Womanhood”. It will lay the foundation and give you a framework. http://www.headcoveringmovement.com/biblical-sermons/biblical-manhood-and-womanhood-sermon

After that, you can try to search the http://cbmw.org/ website for articles or lookup books on complementarianism by Wayne Grudem. He has one in particular that is called “Evangelism Feminism and Biblical Truth” which I think is about 900 pages long. It is almost all Questions and Answers. My wife read the whole book and she said it was really good.

Kinuko H
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Yes, “Evangelical Feminism and Biblical Truth” (Wayne Grudem) is an excellent book. I found that we can read it online.

Jamie Carter
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When I was studying the ‘silent’ passages, the author of the book I was reading described it’s use like this:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oynJcSnLSI4

Before churches, women rarely left their houses and only had a chance to socialize with their immediate neighbors. When they first began going to church, they enjoying meeting other ladies and catching up with them. Since churches were usually gender segregated (and still are in some parts of the Middle East) women were in the back, chatting noisily over the sound of screaming infants; this proved distracting to the men that were supposed to be learning theology in the front. Without knowing that context, people think that women are supposed to be silent (not speaking) that’s not what he was really going for, he was just asking them to be quieter as we all know it’s impossible to get very young children to be silent. Which is why I don’t apply the verse to women today as they don’t live in the same situation as their ancient counterparts.

Since I’m an Egalitarian, I get resources from here: http://www.cbeinternational.org/ I believe that the Holy Spirit gifts the same gifts to men and women alike, and we are meant to use them to build each other up (mutual edification Romans 14:19) So I would allow women to teach men, young women to serve in any capacity they choose, as I take Galatians 3:28 very seriously. I also believe that head covering is optional for that reason. I know it’s not the accepted teaching from this movement, but you do need to know that there are two sides to every coin, and it’s the same with Christianity; every teaching can be interpreted in more than just one way.

Kinuko H
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Hi, I saw your thought-provoking comment on Jessica’s blog and I found you here again and came to say hello! I agree with you that “we are not living in an ideal world filled with ideal churches with ideal families.” There are many situations which we should re-examine and ask Him to shed further light on each particular issue. And actually, I love your questions. These are not dumb at all. Because sincere questions help all of us to grow in the knowledge of Him. I also ask many questions! Lastly, please allow me to share with you the excerpts from the book “By Searching” (written by Isobel Kuhn)

“When is the search ended? In one sense, it is finished when our hand, stretched out to God in the name of His appointed mediator Jesus Christ feels the answering grasp and knows that He is there.

But in another sense, the searching never ends; for the first discovery is quickly followed by another and that by another–and so it goes on.

As I write, it is dawning a new day. The far horizon has seen the bright spot of the rising sun, but heavy clouds soon covered it. These clouds have become illuminated and streaks of pink and gold beauty are breaking through chance rents in their filmy cover. Glory after glory appears as the eye eagerly explores the heavens.

And so it is with God. To find that He is, this is the mere starting point of our search. We are lured on to explore what He is, and that search is never finished, for it grows more thrilling the further one proceeds.” (Chapter 10, By Searching)

from your fellow pilgrim, Kinuko

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