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Should Christian Women Wear the Hijab?

Should Christian Women Wear the Hijab?

The dictionary definition of the Hijab is “a traditional scarf worn by Muslim women to cover the hair and neck and sometimes the face.” 1) hijab. Dictionary.com. Dictionary.com Unabridged. Random House, Inc. http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/hijab (accessed: December 18, 2015). The definition itself identifies this as Islamic dress. So the question is, should Christian women use a Hijab to cover their heads when praying and prophesying (1 Cor 11:5-6)?

As we’ve covered already, the passage in 1 Corinthians 11 doesn’t identify any particular style for covering the head. Paul uses a verb to command an action (cover her head) rather than using a noun to indicate a particular style (e.g, put on a hijab). This means the style of covering falls into the category of Christian liberty. So if the question is, “is it biblically permissible to wear a Hijab?”, the answer is yes. However, a second question that should be asked is, “is it wise to do so?” Before we give our opinion, I think it’s important to understand the ​two main views in this debate.

View #1: No Hijab: Surrendering Liberty to Avoid Confusion

The first viewpoint is that as Christians we should avoid confusion about who we serve at all costs. A Hijab in Western culture is identified as Muslim clothing. 2) In cultures where the Hijab is not identified as Islamic dress, there would be no issue. In that case, it would be a perfectly acceptable choice for Christian women.  So if a person sees a woman wearing one in public they will generally assume that she identifies with that religion. If she helps someone by “[letting her] light shine before others, so that they may see your good works and give glory to your Father who is in heaven” (Matt 5:16) people may wrongly direct that praise to Allah or his followers. That of course can be overcome by saying you’re a Christian, but if we’re honest we don’t always say ‘I’m doing this for Jesus’ when we’re doing good works. So this mindset would conclude that because the Hijab is so closely associated with Islam, that Christian women should use a different style.

View #2: Pro-Hijab: Don’t Surrender What’s Good

Genesis 9:13 Button

The pro-Hijab viewpoint is usually argued one of two ways. The first is that Christians should not have to surrender anything that is neutral or good. To give a similar example, the rainbow is closely understood as a symbol of homosexuality. However, believers understand that God is the creator of the rainbow, and it’s a beautiful symbol that he instituted as a promise to not flood the world again (Gen 9:12-17). Since that’s the case, those of this mindset won’t surrender the rainbow to allow it to represent a sinful lifestyle even though it risks confusion. Similarly, the Hijab is a beautiful form of dress which is not inherently Islamic, so Christians should feel free to use it. The other way the pro-Hijab position is argued is that if the public makes wrong assumptions based on the style of covering they wear, they should not be held responsible for that. We should not make decisions based on the opinions of others if they are inaccurate.

Our View

On the Head Covering Movement, we have featured testimonies of women who wear the Hijab. We will continue to do this and we support women who choose this form of covering as it is a matter of Christian liberty. We also realize that women can look beautiful wearing one. Having said that, it’s not a style that we would recommend for those who cover full time. If you only cover for church services then it’s clear who you’re worshipping and there is no confusion. However, the same cannot be said if you also cover during everyday life. Just a chapter before the head covering passage, Paul gave instructions to the Corinthians regarding meat sacrificed to idols. He said that even though it’s perfectly acceptable to eat this kind of meat, he told them to deny themselves this liberty if someone informs them that it was sacrificed (1 Cor 10:28). He told them to forbid themselves something that is good for the sake of the other person. Much like the pro-Hijab position, the Corinthians thought, “…why should my liberty be determined by someone else’s conscience?” (1 Cor 10:29) but that type of mentality is not others focused. We should be willing to deny ourselves what is our liberty to do for the sake of other people (Rom 14:20-21). So since the majority of people make an association between the Hijab and Islam, I think it’s wisdom for Christian women to use a different style when in public.

Discussion: This is an opinion piece, so we’d love to hear your take.  Ladies, have you or would you wear the Hijab? Tell us why you choose or reject that style by leaving a comment below.

References

1.
 hijab. Dictionary.com. Dictionary.com Unabridged. Random House, Inc. http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/hijab (accessed: December 18, 2015).
2.
 In cultures where the Hijab is not identified as Islamic dress, there would be no issue. In that case, it would be a perfectly acceptable choice for Christian women.

Jeremy Gardiner

Jeremy is the founder of the Head Covering Movement and the author of Head Covering: A Forgotten Christian Practice for Modern Times. He lives in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada and is a member of Fellowship Baptist Church. He is a husband to Amanda and father to four young children. Jeremy is also the founder and operator of Gospel eBooks, a popular website that provides alerts for free and discounted Christian e-books.

Latest posts by Jeremy Gardiner (see all)

  • Kathy Tyler

    I agree that the hijab can definitely confuse people. I think it is best to cover in such a way that leads people to Christ, not Allah. One day I was in a store and noticed a woman wearing a beautiful tichel and believed she must be either Christian or a more orthodox Jewish woman. I stopped and talked to her only to find out she was Muslim. So sometimes they don’t wear the hijab, either.

    • Chantelle Monroe

      Kathy, yes, it can be a confusing topic which is why I am glad that a forum like this exists to share ideas. Every depiction of Mother Mary in our church shows her wearing what could be called a hijab over her head. Eventually I decided to try wearing a hijab. Nothing wrong with trying right?

      As women our choices in clothing are very scrutinized both inside and outside of church so there is no end of opinions on every detail.

      I’m currently unmarried, and it is interesting to hear guys opinion on the matter, some are expected, some not.

  • Joshua Perkins

    If a Christian woman chooses to wear a hijab, I would suggest she consider also wearing a cross on a necklace; that way, the concern that others might be confused would be largely mitigated.

    • clarinetlaj

      While i would encourage women to choose another style, this IS a good compromise :) smart idea

      • Brenda

        However, most Christian women are confused with their worldly neighbors who do not profess faith in anything at all, conforming in clothing and style to those around them, and they are sadly, not told to change. Better I think to cover, even if it is a cover that is traditionally used by a certain faith. I guarantee that it will provoke more conversations, giving you a chance to voice your faith then if you go uncovered. However, my cover of choice is not a hijab, it varies in public, but scarves tied as headbands with tails hanging down, wide headbands, scarves partially covering my hair. I think Christian women can learn from our Muslim women who are not afraid to stand out in a crowd. However it is likely true many would confuse the faith unless a verbal conversation occurred.

    • I think that’s a great idea Joshua! Helps to mitigate the confusion.

    • Kimberly

      This is what I do when I wear a tichel style, as well.

      • Julie L.

        (Just for other people’s clarification, a “tichel” is a Jewish head covering. Typically a large square, folded into a triangle, wrapped around the head and hair in a bun-like fashion. But there are many other ways of wearing a “tichel”)

  • Shelli

    First I would be asking why is a man writing about this women’s subject & secondly this is a badly written piece!
    No christian women should not be wearing a hijab it is “wrong”, the bible doesn’t tell us to cover for subjection.
    And secondly about the gay rainbow, this is not Gd’s rainbow! :/
    Gd’s Rainbow is perfect, therefore it has “seven” colour’s…, the gay rainbow is man’s rainbow therefore symbolises imperfection by having six colour’s!

    • Lisa

      You make some good points, Shelli…

    • Hi Shelli, this isn’t a woman’s subject, this is a Biblical subject. All of Scripture is profitable for teaching and we have numerous examples of men being commissioned to preach all of Scripture (2 Tim 4:2). For example Paul told Timothy to “command and teach these things” (1 Tim 4:11) which included direct commands pertaining to women such as that they are to “learn quietly with all submissiveness.” (1 Tim 2:11). So I think the mindset that only women can speak to women is not Biblical. Rather, we should interpret it as God’s word being explained and applied.

      • Sara June Thompson

        Yes, God has ordained men to be the leaders in the church. I am glad to hear a man not afraid to speak up and teach that women should practice head covering. I wish more male pastors would do so.

        • Julie L.

          Amen!

      • Brenda

        I agree this is not just a matter for women, but a matter for the whole church. I like to use the word yield rather then submit
        . It doesn’t have the loaded feel to it that the word submit does. I personally think that submission is a word that has been so misrepresented, since has in the past been misused by some Christian men to assert themselves at the expense of their wives, not treating them as Christ treated the church. Some women were oppressed by men demanding things of their wives in very, very selfish ways, and using the submission ticket to force women to comply to whims, to sexual desires, and if marriages were not going well, and Christian women went to pastors of counseling, they were told to give sex, regardless of their husbands behavior, their loveless acts, their ingratitude, their selfishness, making the wives feel their needs didn’t matter. I have heard the stories of too many women in conservative and even not so conservative circles who were told to put up with abuse and that their only option as a Christian is to remain with or return to their abusive husband or been told that the burden of the relationship was on them and if there was failure fingers from pastors were pointed their way. I think submission is a beautiful thing when it is used in the order and way God meant to be, but due to the misuse of it, many women cringe at the word submission. It has been paired with things in the past that were not submission at all, but dominance and disregard, not love.
        And I consider myself fairly conservative.

    • Chantelle Monroe

      I had never heard this about rainbows. =)

  • Barbara

    I think Christian women in a Muslim country need to cover both their heads and their necks to avoid cultural clashes. However, that can be done without wearing a hijab so as to avoid confusion–such as wearing a veil plus a scarf. Most Christian women put off Muslims with their immodest clothing, even Muslims who are not extremists. Muslims are modest for the wrong reasons usually–fear, cultural pride etc., but the bible commands modesty, and we should not let our clothing be a temptation to men or a bad example to women.

    • Julie L.

      I agree. Our clothing should not draw sexual attention to ourselves.

      • Chantelle Monroe

        I agree, but where do you draw the line? I can’t imagine anyone finding an elbow sexual, but yet some folks feel elbows must be covered.

        • Julie L.

          I respect any women who covers more than me. But currently the Holy Spirit has told me that I need to AT LEAST cover my shoulders, my chest, my thighs/knees, and everything in between.

          I do not wear any form-fitting clothes. And I only wear skirts and dresses. Maybe someday I’ll cover my elbows. I even follow these standards for swimming.

    • Chantelle Monroe

      I had never even met, nor spoke to a Muslim prior to this past February. I met this young woman an an event promoting hijabs, and I had to ask her: In your opinion is my outfit modest enough? She surprsingly said yes… as soon as you cover your hair. Interesting that there is a crossover point where you would be acceptable to both camps.

      • Pani Pirhadi

        I hope that your interaction was a positive one?

        • Chantelle Monroe

          Pani, yes it was.

      • Brenda

        Well said and sadly not followed. I myself at one point wore outfits showing the better parts of my legs off, well above the knee, half way up the thigh. Women do this all the time, sadly to say since we have been told our worth is in if we can turn a man’s head. As soon as I began to cover, my clothing style has changed. All the skirts above the knees were removed from my wardrobe, the one at or below the knee may be on the way out and my preferred length is mid shin, or ankle length. My sleeve lengths have increased as well.

  • I agree wholeheartedly with this matter, for I myself have weighed this out in every which way possible. We recently discussed this in our head-covering group. My personal practice in modesty is to honor Christ Jesus. I was led to cover by HIM, for HIM and therefore when I am out in the presence of others, I seek to honor YHWH Yeshua in all ways possible. And when I do good for others because HE has blessed me with it, I want there to be no confusion whom it is I serve and from whom those gifts originate from…none other than CHRIST HIMSELF.

    I also have come to see that if our goal is to strive and awaken the Body of Christ to raise to an honorable role in service by modesty, as women who are of CHRIST, we do more honor to our beliefs by showing other religions that ACTUAL WOMEN WHO ARE IN CHRIST, are blessed with the ability to walk in holiness and honor our bodies and roles as women as well, with all possibility of gaining respect to our LORD and Savior from those whom are unbelievers as well, all in one mind and accord. Modern Christianity by the masses in America has failed to maintain these principles due to liberality, and has caused a great disruption from homes to extended community. If our goal is to revive what has been lost for the sake of the Kingdom, then we cannot allow “fashion” to dictate but rather the Spirit. Hijab is beautiful and we want to take it back, but there has to be a clearer and better way to do it without adding confusion to the mix. The devil loves confusion, for he has much room to manipulate in it. Why give it over to the enemy due to our own double-mindedness.

    • Julie L.

      “We can not allow ‘fashion’ to dictate but rather the Spirit”.

      Well said sister. Always best to follow the prompting of the Holy Spirit rather than additional rules written by mankind.

  • clarinetlaj

    Proud of you for this post! It was very balanced with grace and freedom while still calling for wisdom.

  • Antony N Jilly

    No!
    ~Jilly oxo

  • Sara June Thompson

    I think this is a good article, it shows both sides of the issue. When I first started covering my dh was very quick to point out that a scarf looked “too Muslim” and was not ok with him. I only use hats and wide headbands and I agree with his position. I have heard stories of other dh’s who felt the same way, they feel it is associated with the Muslim faith and are afraid someone way even take some action against their dw, assuming she is Muslim. I think there are times it is good for a woman to wear this style-if she has a Muslim husband or parents she is submitting to, if she lives in a Muslim country and that is the expected standard of modesty of a chaste woman out in public, , if she has as ministry to Muslims (either official or just God opens doors to witness regularly) and she feels this enhances that ministry. And some ladies may just feel very called to do so and if it is ok with their earthly authority figures. In those cases I agree with poster below that adding a prominent cross can help avoid confusion. But in the absence of a compelling reason to choses this style, I agree with the article that it may be wiser to choose another style that does not make us look like another religion (whether Muslim, Jewish, Hindu etc.). Even taking that same scarf and draping it loosely showing a little of the hair, the full face and front of the neck transforms the looks from “Muslim like” to “Mary like”. JMO.

    • Julie L.

      Well put and graceful.

    • Bunnie Boo

      My husband felt the same way, he was concerned I would be taken for Muslim since I’m olive-skinned. I much prefer the hijab or even an infinity scarf draped as a hijab but I wear a plain bandana or scarf with a bit of hairline showing. When I’ve finished growing my hair out I will wear my hair up when it is covered.

    • Chantelle Monroe

      Did you ask your Priest/Pastor what they thought on the matter?

      • Sara June Thompson

        Our church does not practice modesty or head covering. In fact some of the young girls at our church wear less to church in the summer than I wear to the beach. This conviction stems from the Lord leading and convicting me, as well as my experience in the past in other churches or churches my coworkers go to.

        • Chantelle Monroe

          Don’t you feel that modesty for adults and modesty for little kids can be different?

          • Sara June Thompson

            i meant young lades who often dress very provocatively to church, teens and young adults, not small children.

          • Brenda

            Too true and sad to be honest.

    • Brenda

      A side not explored here is the advantage this would have in witnessing and starting conversations with Muslim women that then testify to your faith.

  • Laura I.

    I live right across the river from Portland, OR, and just SE of that is the biggest terrorist training camp for Is- lam in America. I do see the ladies running around with their hijabs on, and they represent something much different for me. The hijab is a reminder that I do need to fear for my life. Their religious book actually commands them to kill (specifically decapitate) the infidel (anyone not of their religion). The English translation of their book waters down everything big time, but in the original text, that’s exactly what it says. I can tell you that you might as well wear a witch’s hat. Both witchcraft and Is- lam involve worshipping a false god. The religions originated from the same source (the devil), so what’s the difference?

    Not only that, but my husband’s family was formerly that religion and turned to Christianity. When I first started to cover 4 years ago, the first thing he said he was only ok with me wearing hats (scarves like a headband ended being ok). He and his family are so repulsed by what the Mu- slims represent, he wants me to look 100% the opposite.

    • Chantelle Monroe

      Have you tried looking at different fabrics? In the Catholic faith, a lace headcovering does communicated Catholic, not Muslim, as they can’t wear see-thru fabric.

      • Sara June Thompson

        I love the Catholic veils and hope to get one some day.

        • Chantelle Monroe

          Yes, they are. I have a white one and am glad I bought it!

  • Mmolesy

    I tend to side with HCM on this subject. But for those who suggested wearing a cross around ones neck to let others know they are Christian, sounds good. But could be asking for some trouble if it is done in public. A Muslim man may find it a great insult to see a Christian woman wearing their traditional dress. And may stir up trouble that could end in tradgedy. it is quite possible that the hijab was actually part of traditional Jewish dress. But was taken up largely by the Muslim populous later on. I think if this is a ladies chosen form of covering, it should be done with much prayer and the Lords wisdom. I myself would not choose it.

    • Chantelle Monroe

      I think most Christian women who do, or are considering practicing headcovering are only thinking of doing so during prayer, Bible study, or at church (correct me if I am wrong). This act of practicing Christian faith properly identifies you more than your clothing. I also would like to offer that there an many different ways to wrap/tie a headscarf to neutralize it a little bit. Much prayer has led me to try it.

      • Brenda

        Chantelle, I am part of a Christian women’s headcovering facebook group, and there are over 1016 women who cover, and the majority on the site do so full time. For me the blessings of headcovering began to pour in right away. I don’t cover to identify myself as a Christian, I cover because scripture states to cover when praying or prophesying, and we are to do that without seasing. I feel more spiritually protected, less harassed by thoughts, feelings or emotions. I am treated decidedly different by others. I pray more, repent more quickly, and more aware of my creator. It is like there is just an unseen authority walking with me, and I reap the benefits of that. It is changing my marriage and it certainly makes me more aware of yielding to my husband in matters ( something I am finding liberating rather then repressive), though difficult to do when we have been taught to stand up for ourselves. It is as though I am coming into the position I was created for and not fighting to rise to something else.

        • Chantelle Monroe

          Brenda, that was a very inspiring look into your life. I’m happy to hear of the change for the better that headcovering has brought you. May I ask you how much of your hair you cover? I seem to find that that does vary greatly from person to person? Is there a particular technique or style you favor? The very first time I wore a headscarf it was just to ‘try’ it, and oddly it was hijab-style. I did for sure feel something hard to explain that day. Sunday, February 7th, 2016, I had an inspiration to go ahead and wear a headcovering to church… and I have not stopped since. I have also expanding to headcovering and modest dress all day on Sunday. I find that it has provided more meaningful prayer, and has been a good re-charge to face the work week ahead.

          • Brenda

            I cover the top part of my hair, and with some scarves I cover most of the hair but allow the bangs of my hair to show. For me headcovering full time has changed me. I am more aware of modest attire and clothing that I would have considered fairly conservative by most standards have worked their way out of my wordrobe. It is like I am becoming more aware of how impacted by American society I had become as far as modesty. I am finding myself more drawn to maxi shirts most days or longer skirts to my shin or ankle. Sleeve length is growing longer for me too. I still do wear pants some, but like the idea of moving to mainly wearing pants if I have a long tunic style top to cover the back. It is like I am being programed for how God views modesty, not modesty as opposed to the American style we are used to seeing. I have done the tichel style scarf, which I still like. I haven’t done the Hijab style yet, I have wrapped the entire head except left bangs out as my husband wants to see a bit of hair there.. I mainly use scarves and cover most of the hair, but allow the hair to flow out the back.

          • Chantelle Monroe

            Brenda, Are you finding that parts of your life are easier to interject a modest wardrobe into? My family and church are very accepting of a modest outfit, but with my friends and work it would bring heavy scrutiny.

          • Brenda

            I think the biggest thing is getting over what others think. I cannot say I have completely arrived. The key for me is trying to have my security in Him, not in what others think of me. If I was really picked on or teased, I suppose that would be difficult. I don’t know what type of job you have, but many jobs allow for modest types of clothing without a lot of scrutiny. I do like to find clothing that doesn’t make me completely stick out like a freak, but these days a long maxi skirt or shin length dress is totally acceptable and longer sleeves in the business world is acceptable. Why is heavy scrutiny necessarily something bad? If your friends ask you why your attire has changed, you can say your preferences in clothing have changed, and you feel more comfortable and modest in the clothing style you are now choosing. You could even state, I started by wearing this, and found I really felt at home in this type of clothing. I also don’t feel like I need to worry about if anything is showing or if it is too short. In the end, it helped me to feel I am modest and comfortable. In the end what if my friends and work scrutinize modest clothing? Finding skirts or pants with longer tunics or sweaters that would be more acceptable in those settings. I think really there is no reason one cannot either have pants with a longer tunic or sweater or a longer skirt. Head covering fulltime can bring more scrutiny and that is why I choose the wide headband styles and the scarves that can work as a half cover allowing hair to flow down the back. This allows you to match the outfit while still following his command to cover when praying which we are told to do continually. I love the changes I see from covering full time.

    • Pani Pirhadi

      I don’t feel that wearing both a cross and a hijab is asking for trouble in public. I don’t see it as insulting in any way.

      You are correct that much prayer should take place on matters like these.

  • Jessica

    I have been wearing a “hijab style” head covering for months now. I actually rather think it is a good idea, because when people assume you are muslim & start talking to you about muslim things, it is a good oppurtunity to bring up Christ, because I am obviously not muslim. Just based off my experiences.

    • Julie L.

      Very cool way to look at it. I don’t wear a hijab, but I am amazed by your ability to turn it into a Biblical discussion. Praise God!

    • Victoria Miller

      You make a good point Jessica. It does give you the opportunity to talk about your faith in Christ. When and where do you headcover?

    • Laura I.

      I’m a little timid about the fact that only some people talk to you while the other hundreds of people who see you have no reason to doubt that there’s yet another “Mu slim” in town. I just want all people to instantly know the truth of to Whom you belong.

      • Pani Pirhadi

        Being shunned is very hurtful. This is true. Think of moments like this as more an opportunity, and opportunity for you to more frequently approach people with a big smile and a glowing energy to your soul to say “Hello. I’m Laura. How are you?” With all the kindness and compassion you can. Be an example of a wonderful caring human being who is behaving correctly. You will be surprised how your behaving well can correct others who then realize they were being gossipy and spiteful. Finish every conversation with “God bless you”. Take every opportunity to tell the world “I am a member of (whatever) Christian Church, and been going there now for (whatever) years.” Allow your inside to outshine your outside. See to it that every person whom encounters you walks away thinking: Wow, she really is a nice person. I really misjudged her.

        • Julie L.

          Good tips. I find people staring at me quite often but am too shy to talk with them about it. Although I’m not part of any specific church or denomination, I think it’s important that people know why I am covering. It can turn a confusing situation into one that brings glory to God.

    • Pani Pirhadi

      Jessica, that is wonderful to hear. May you be blessed in your hijab practice.

    • Brenda

      I think that is beautiful. I guess the way I see it is, Christian women blend into the culture around them, dressing as all their neighbors, by and large, atheists, agnostics and that makes not statement of their faith at all. Yes persons might make an initial assumption with a head cover that is Hijab style, however, this at least draws attention to a religious affiliation, whereas an uncovered women is just like her neighbor for better or worse, and unfortunately often for the worse. We have been so desensitized by the culture around us we just completely blend in. If a person wears a hijab, she is likely to get more questions and comments then an uncovered women.

  • Julie L.

    A couple years ago when I was choosing which head covering style to purchase, I read an article that said NOT to wear a covering that would associate me with a particular religion or even a specific Christian denomination. I thought this was good advice and eventually settled on several “non-denominational” styles. I choose to not look like a Catholic Nun, a Muslim, a Jewish woman, a Mennonite, an Amish woman etc. I’m simply an obedient Christian who wants to point to Christ.

    I purposefully choose to NOT wear a hijab. I also do not wear my head coverings in such a way as to cover my hair line and my ears completely. I can make myself look Muslim, or I can simply cover my head as the Bible says. Personally, I do not cover my hair (only my head), but this is not obvious until you see my very long hair from the back. Muslim women DO cover their hair.

    Maybe someone can correct me, but I thought Muslim women view their hair as part of their sexuality, reserved only for their husband???

    • Bunnie Boo

      I’ve read a few articles that pointed out Muslim women cover for modesty while Jewish & Christian women do do out of submission to husbands. It was interesting to say the least

    • Chantelle Monroe

      I’m curious if any women at your Christian church are promoting headcovering? Has anyone ever put on a workshop or anything? Nothing like that has happened at our church. If more women even knew how to wear them or that it was accepted I think more would try it. It feels silly that I had to learn how to headcover from a Muslim woman. She assured me that I could wear a hijab as a Christian woman.

      • Julie L.

        Oh how I wish that I knew of a church that taught head coverings in Utah. I do not currently attend any denominational church. My husband leads a small home Bible study. But the many churches I’ve attended in 30 years have NEVER taught this sorely needed subject. I personally have not met another covering woman, which is why I found this site. And I LOVE that women from other faiths are on this site. It is certainly a subject for us to be discussing both inside and outside of the church.

    • Pani Pirhadi

      There can be thought to be sexuality in hair, but hair is not reserved only for husbands. Islamic headcovering typically begins at the age of puberty, and is done in the presence of adult males outside of their immediate family and non-Muslim women. At a family dinner, for example, uncovered heads abound.

      This simple misunderstood cloth commonly called hijab does not aim to attack Western and
      Judeo-Christian values of modesty, good character and righteousness;
      rather, it seeks to uphold them. For example, the hijab resembles
      the habit of a nun in Christian Europe, who is almost always seen as a
      symbol of piety and someone who upholds good morals. This is also
      supported historically in Christianity and Judaism, in which paintings
      of righteous women such as Mary, the mother of Jesus (may the peace and
      blessings of Allah be upon them both), depict them with a head covering.

      Every woman is going to have a different take on the how, when, where aspects of headcovering. It is a personal choice between a woman and our creator. I applaud any woman who finds a place for it no matter how big or small.

  • Rachel Pickering Ford

    I’m a Catholic woman who lately, has been feeling more and more convicted by the Lord to cover my head and dress more modestly. But honestly, it is near impossible to find modest clothes in shops that aren’t incredibley masculine and ugly, so I just buy Muslim dresses online and wear them! They are feminine, modest and beautiful. I want so badly to wear a hijab as well, but I don’t because I want people to know I am a Christian and not a Muslim. I want to bring full-hijab-head covering back into the mainstream for Christians! I honestly believe it is the most godly, feminine and modest way to dress.

    • Victoria Miller

      I respect you for feeling the call to dress more modestly as a way to better immerse into your faith. Have you considered starting with a Catholic mantilla veil? Those are very nice but still very obviously Catholic. Hijab’s are actually really nice to wear, they are a more comprehensive covering but they really don’t feel un-Christian to wear, they look more Islamic, but you can dress up the rest of your wardrobe to offset it. My main advice is that if you are called… give it a try, but start at home. Just try headcovering for prayer at first so it’s only about you and God before you move into the more public committment.

      • Julie L.

        Well rounded response.

    • Julie L.

      I do agree that Muslim dresses are quite modest and feminine. There’s something about a woman in a long, flowing dress that is just so right……

      • Pani Pirhadi

        That is wonderful to hear Julie.

        • Julie L.

          I love seeing a Muslim woman covering and dressing modestly. I just wish I had a few Muslim friends to discuss things like this.

          • Pani Pirhadi

            Julie
            As a Muslim, I would be happy to discuss modesty with you, and you can count me as a friend and sister of good morals.

    • Chantelle Monroe

      Rachel, I am Catholic as well. I admire your bravery and conviction in your buying Muslim dresses. Do you wear them day to day or just to church? This past February, a few weeks after my mother passed away I wore a hijab for the first time. It may or may not surprise you but wearing it did not feel wrong! Do any of the women at your church wear the Mantilla/Chapel veils? Some at our church have been, it’s part of a Latin Mass Revivial. There is now usually between 2-7 women/girls wearing a headcovering of some kind at every mass.

  • Victoria Miller

    Everyone sure has some good and interesting points to make. If you had asked me two years ago: Should Christian women wear hijab? I would have said no. If you ask me today… I’m going to say yes. Now please hear me out, I don’t mean every day, I don’t mean for the wrong reasons, but if you are just looking at while praying and while at church… yes.

    Trust me, I know this sounds controversial for me to say, but if you really think and pray about it, what is wrong in trying? If it helps you and your relationship with God, why not? Is is not a personal decision more than opening your life choices up to public opinion? After all I like many Christian women wore a veil for my wedding. I didn’t doubt doing so and no one in church would have thought to question it.

    Some of you have made the valid point that hijab by name and practice is commonly associated with Islam, but the actual practice of headcovering is actually much older and more widespread. I have asked myself is hijab more an expression of Islam or is it simply an expression of faith in God? Does the ‘regular’ clothes we Christians wear really show ourselves as women of God or do we more look secular?

    Now, on to the question:

    have you or would you wear the Hijab? Tell us why you choose or reject that style?

    Yes, I have worn the hijab. It was two February’s ago, and had it been any sooner in life I would not have, but I guess the opportunity knocked at the right time and place? As I reflect on that day I would say hijab chose me rather than me choosing hijab, lol. I had never worn a headcovering before in life beyond a hat, and it just happened that the first time anyone asked me if I wanted to try a headcovering this was the one being offered. Yes, the woman was Muslim, so yes I was not so sure about it, but her and her friends were doing a promotion for understanding that day at a little kiosk they had set up.

    I’m not fully sure why I chose to participate. For sure I had just never tried anything like that, despite considering myself a modest person. I’m kind of glad that there was no mirror as she was showing me how and putting a white and then purple 2-pc hijab headcovering on me to try because… and I hate to admit this… I was worried about what I would look like. I kept trying to instead ask what did I feel like? Which was a question that took longer to conclude than the time it took to put on.

    The whole time I had it on that first time my main conclusion was that it didn’t feel wrong to be wearing it. My young son even said he liked it when I asked what he thought.

    The first thing I did when I got home was pray, after all, that is what you often hear is that they offer clarity of prayer. I really did feel that it was a real aid, being that your ears and everything but face are covered I found that I could get into a deeper state of prayer. That was encouraging. My main worry I prayed about was if I should show my husband or not? My heart said yes, but then before he got home I quickly took it off and stuffed it deep into a drawer. =(

    The next morning I dug it out and tried to see if I could remember how to ever put it back on again. After a few misses I was able. I said a morning prayer in it then put it away. I did this each morning for three more days that evening before bed in a spontaneous act I simply asked my husband what he thought of the idea of my covering my head for prayer at night. He seemed a little surprised by the question but was supportive, so i covered my head in my hijab, kneelt down and prayed as I did every night before bed. When done, I removed my hijab and went to bed. A curious look, but no comments given.

    I still own and use my hijab headcovering for prayer to this day. There is no statement to be made, it just works for me. In a life where we all face some me, me, me moments, what I appreciate is being able to be humble, and for this the hijab delivers.

    • Julie L.

      That is an awesome testimony. Thank you for sharing. I love your question: “Does the ‘regular’ clothes we Christians wear really show ourselves as women of God or do we more look secular?”

      I think that would be a great discussion question.

      • Victoria Miller

        Thank you, and you are welcome.

    • Bunnie Boo

      I think it’s appropriate because what other covering do we have as Christian women outside mantillas, Mennonite bonnets, Jacke Zkennedy headscarves and the Amish kapp? Why should women of Islam be considered the most pious for covering?

  • Caroline Carlson

    I wish male writers would focus on commenting on male behavior. Let women discuss and decide for themselves. We don’t need men to be so focused on our behavior. Men have plenty of issues to deal with and should focus on those.

    • Bunnie Boo

      Yes, the man bring directly under Christ’s headship with the woman coming after him is extremely important fir husbands and pastors. We are all members of the same Body with different roles

      • Caroline Carlson

        This subservient stuff is what soured me to Christianity. Bible also tells slaves to obey their masters. Should we bring back slavery? Do you also sacrifice doves after you menstruate? God gave us a brain and wants us to use it. This stuff about being subservient to men is laughable.

        • Bunnie Boo

          I don’t need animal sacrifices, Christ died once and for all. And we still have slavery, it’s called working for minimum wage. If you won’t submit to a father, husband it pastor you cannot say you’ve submitted to God. Christ made the ultimate submission to religious authorities and the Romans — are you better than Him?

          • Caroline Carlson

            If you are free to ignore some rules of the bible then I’m free to ignore the rest. Don’t didn’t Jesus say I’m not here to abolish the law but to fulfill it? If Jesus died to release us from survitude then I’m free to release myself from this archaic and rediculous idea of subservience to men.

          • Bunnie Boo

            I haven’t ignored anything but hey, this isn’t really about Christ or religion but about you, what you think and what you hate.

            Why are you even here if you’ve found a religion that tells you what your itching ears want to hear?

          • Caroline Carlson

            So you are sacrificing doves after you finish your period and not wearing mixed fiber clothing? Really?

          • Bunnie Boo

            You aren’t trying to find out what Christians are doing, you want someone to argue with you. Since the issues you are raising deal with Torah, go find an Ultra Orthodox Jewish forum and let her rip. I’m being blessed by God who called me before the foundation of the earth for His purposes. Have a nice life and I’m praying God answer all of your questions.

          • Caroline Carlson

            Radical Christians are fighting everyday to take away rights from Americans. I’m always looking at what your groups are looking to do next.

          • Chantelle Monroe

            Why are you upset about rights? Yes, many people from all walks of life wish to take away rights. If you say that is bad then surely you must be an anarchist who thinks everyone should have the right to do whatever they want whenever they want? I don’t want that. I don’t think every American has the right to own a military assault rifle! Yes I would take away that right because you know I like to live in a place where I don’t feel as if I may be murdered at any moment. Democracy and majority rules, and freedom of speech exists.

          • Caroline Carlson

            Too far out into,left field Chantelle sorry. Can’t get from wanting gender equality equating wanting assault rifles. Come back when you can stay on topic and not make illogical comparisons. Wanting gender equality doesn’t equate to be anarchist. Wanting gender equality doesn’t equate wanting assault weapons readily available. You’re reaching here….and illogically so.

          • Chantelle Monroe

            Yes, I get the idea, you are raging angry at the whole world, enjoy your unhappiness.

          • Caroline Carlson

            Not raging at the whole world. Pleased with many things. Just contemptuous of misogyny and any ignorance which suggests I should enjoy it or that somehow it’s actually endorsed by God.

        • Chantelle Monroe

          Don’t you think all humans need to accept some aspect of humility. I know “subservient” is a scarry and threatening word to throw around in 2016, but the reality is that I have several bosses at work every Monday thru Friday and yes for sure I am subservient to them, but I get over it. I enjoy my paycheck on Friday. All of us humans have a wonderful sense of self but the fact is that we are far smaller that we like to imagine ourselves.

          • Caroline Carlson

            Respecting authority where it is due is a smart thing. Accepting authority based on gender is asinine.

    • Kim

      Feminist?

      • Caroline Carlson

        Yes I believe women should be considered equal

        • Kim

          Equality means that men and women can comment on each other’s behaviors. Only women commenting on women’s behaviors and saying only women should do so, is not equality.

          • Cody Goldsbury

            Equality means that men and women can comment on each other’s behaviors. Only women commenting on women’s behaviors and saying only women should do so, is not equality.

            I’m reminded of Titus 2:3-5, “Older women likewise are to be reverent in behavior, not slanderers or slaves to much wine. They are to teach what is good, and so train the young women to love their husbands and children, to be self-controlled, pure, working at home, kind, and submissive to their own husbands, that the word of God may not be reviled.”

            Biblically speaking, women were instructed to teach … but only other women and children, only those on the same level as them or below. Were they equal? Or was the prohibition against teaching and having authority over men in 1 Timothy 2 creating an inequality? Are women permitted to comment on the behavior of men in the same way men may comment on the behavior of women?

          • Caroline Carlson

            And yet we don’t see many discussions from both men and women over the appropriate and modest and pious dress code for men. Yet in many many circumstances how women are dressed is considered an indication of some moral consideration. No equal. An extension of the control men seek to have over women.

          • Cody Goldsbury

            No, we don’t. To affirm true equality, then women should have the freedom to comment on the behaviors men and do so regularly to the point where people think nothing of it and it’s not out of place. One complaint I see often is that young women are instructed to wear t-shirts when swimming, and young men are not. A great way to even out the playing field is to require both men and women to wear t-shirts when swimming.

          • Brenda

            This would indeed be a positive thing. True too often it is the women’s attire that gets focused on, not mens. Why wouldn’t we want men covering their chest with a tee shirt, since his sexuality shines through in a bathing suit. Having both cover would be awesome. I recently saw the Muslim women’s swim suits, and I find I would feel more modest in that type of swim suit attire, though currently, it is not what I wear.

          • Caroline Carlson

            If we didn’t have such a history of men dominating women and denying them equality then perhaps we could see it a single such. Since it’s still an aspect of men’s and women’s relations it doesn’t feel appropriate. Men have always controlled women and advocating for how they dress is a continuation of that. We don’t see discussions of how men should dress. Only women. It’s outdated and a continuation of the control men seek to have over women. How many discussion are there of the appropriate way for men to dress in society to demonstrate their modesty and piety?

  • Lafayette

    I am curious why this article is acting as though Christian women do not use headcoverings. Sure, it is not a mainstream practice however different Christian sects have historically used headcoverings and many continue to do so, although many wear them only in church. Some groups are the Amish, Mennonites, Eastern Orthodox, Antiochian Orthodox, Catholics, nuns and others. I just find it a bit surprising that this is not mentioned and that the author is acting like Muslims are the only ones to follow this practice. I challenge the author to conduct more research and present this issue in a more balanced nature next time.

    • Phoebe

      If you read this site more, you will see that historic and cultural variants of Christian head covering are recognized and affirmed.

      • Lafayette

        That’s good to know…I still think it should be addressed, recognized and affirmed in this article as well. Either way, thank you for the response!

      • Sara June Thompson

        Yes, many articles talk about how Christian women through the ages have covered. this particular article was asking if the hijab style was ok for a Christian woman to wear or not. Yes, I praise God for all the groups that keep the practice of head covering alive as women’s lib turned many churches away from it.

    • Chantelle Monroe

      You are very correct, many different Christians and other faiths do practice some form of headcovering. It’s more than you might expect.

    • Pani Pirhadi

      As shocking as it may sound, many Muslim women do not practice wearing hijab.

      • Julie L.

        That is sad because I love seeing Muslim women in hijab (or any other covering). Every time I see it, I think of nothing but the utmost respect. Especially when it is paired with modest clothing. This is where I find the most common ground. I cover my head full time and I also dress very modestly compared to the rest of the western world. I love to see people who take their faith very seriously.

        • Princess Farah Mustika

          :) subhannallah I like this

    • Brenda

      It is very rare for Christian women except the few exceptions listed to head cover. The vast majority of Christian women today do not whereas the vast majority 30-40 years ago did, in fact you really didn’t see women in church without a covering of some kind, be it a hat or veil etc. I grew up Mennonite and very few of the Mennonite church USA women wear the covering. Most women who wore them full time growing up shed them when we were told that it was cultural and not for today. My mother was a lone person covering in our church for multiple years. Yes the Amish and conservative and old order Mennonite do still cover, and some conservative Presbyterians do, but by and large, covering in church is a thing of the past for all Christian women.

  • Chantelle Monroe

    February 1st, 2016 I wore a hijab for the first time. I am a practicing Catholic, who had lost her mother a few weeks prior and was searching for… something. I had already started infusing some plain dress/modest dress in mid-January. What I needed was to be able to feel closer to God. I was trying to find humility and to free myself from distraction. I had seen other women practice headcovering and it became a curiousity. The opportunity knocked for me through a World Hijab Day event I happened to come across at the right time in my life. Part of me was terrified, but part of me was eager when I accepted the invitation to sit from a young Muslim woman. After what felt like a surreal trip to the hair salon, I emerged to face my day, assured that yes this was okay to be doing as a Christian woman. Upon my first glance in the mirror my thought was that I looked like a child of God. I looked and felt like a person of strong faith. With my ears and head covered it provided a sort of isolation, inner peace, and focus that I had not felt prior. Prayer was wonderful. The following Sunday I wore it to church, and have every Sunday since. Church feels less about me and more about God now. I think it’s perfectly acceptable for a Christian woman to wear a hijab if they are so called.

    • Sara June Thompson

      If you are Catholic you may wish to check our the various kinds of veils that Catholic women have traditionally covered with.

      • Chantelle Monroe

        Thank you. I have, and now own and wear a Catholic mantilla veil to church.

    • Pani Pirhadi

      What a beautiful story sister. It is great that World Hijab Day was actually able to make a real contribution to your life.

    • Julie L.

      Absolutely beautiful. Brought tears to my eyes. Praise God and to Him be all the Glory!

  • Pani Pirhadi

    Yes. Christian women should wear the hijab. Don’t be ashamed to show that you are a woman of faith. Millions of women around the globe practice some form of hijab to strengthen their relationship with our creator. Wearing a hijab during prayer brings humbleness as well as more focus with less distraction. At the very least practicing headcovering in the privacy of your own home while praying is something everyone can do.

  • Rhiannon

    I saw a meme this morning that made me feel sad because it was so accurate. It said: “Modesty: Because it is easier to ask women to dress like shapeless, sexless adolescents than to expect men to think and act like decent human beings.”

    I am all for dressing modestly, but what troubles me is that the vast majority of all modesty teachings are aimed at desexualizing women as though there is something shameful or “sinful” about femininity. Women are taught to hide the shape of their bodies; women are taught to cover their hair; women are taught that jewelry or makeup or anything that makes them look or feel “pretty” is sinful. But notice that all of these “sins” are focused solely on those things that make a woman feel feminine or allows her to enjoy her femininity.

    Where is the commensurate balance for men? Are men taught that liking cars is a sin? Are they told that buying the latest model pick up, or other things that emphasize and support their masculine identity is wrong, prideful or sinful?

    I am not trying to stir the pot or attack in any way. I actually stumbled across this article while looking for articles on modesty that teach it from a perspective or principle that does not denigrate women. My daughters and I have worn dresses for years. We dress modestly. I home school my children. They are polite, well-behaved, respectful young people. I think most of our friends assume we are Christians based on our lifestyle standards when, in actuality, we are pagan. It just troubles me to see any affirmation of masculinity as something right and good, while affirmations of femininity, everything that lets a woman feel feminine, are somehow wrong and sinful.

    If you believe the Bible, men and women were both created in the image of your God, “male and female created he them.” (Genesis 5:2) If you want to live by the laws of Moses, he left strict instructions that men and women were not to dress alike. When women wear head coverings that cover their long hair, when they wear “caped” dresses to hide the shape of their bodies, are they not making their bodies look androgynous and would that not be a sin?

    Again, I am not trying to argue. I am simply looking for truth and principles to teach my children that do not denigrate women as somehow inherently sinful because they aren’t men.

    • Hi Rhiannon, we are definitely not advocating or promoting “frumpiness”. Women should look feminine and can decorate themselves to look beautiful (within guidelines like 1 Tim 2 and 1 Pet 3). I do not believe women must look “plain” and I believe men have just as much of a responsibility to appear modest and to fight against lust.

      • Rhiannon

        Thank you, Jeremy, for your response.

    • Deborah

      I agree with Jeremy. There’s no call for women to look frumpy, however, we must be willing to dress in a way which will not cause our brothers to stumble. Blame-shifting is the mantra of many who defend immodest dressing. “It’s not my fault, it’s his for looking and lusting.” If you want to read a really good article about modesty, here’s a transcribed message which really knocked my socks off! :)
      http://media.sermonaudio.com/mediapdf/2250872194.pdf

      • Rhiannon

        Thank you for the link, Deborah. I appreciate it. I have always dressed modestly, but I think my frustration with how it is generally taught does more than “blame-shift” to men. It, instead, “shame-shifts” to women. I attended boarding school as a kid and the “dress code” was aimed, in its entirety at the female students. That always struck me as unfair. I want my daughters to dress modestly, but at the same time I do not want to make them feel that their bodies are shameful because they are female. Anyway, thank you for the link. I will check it out.

        • Deborah

          You’re welcome :) I think that transcribed message will explain it more thoroughly and definitely more biblically! If I may be so bold to suggest one thing though… I fear your concern about passing on a feeling that our “bodies are shameful becasue they are female” is rooted in the ideology of the feminist movement. They have done such a good job in making us feel like “I am woman, hear me roar.” “I can be, do, and wear whatever I want” “covering up is oppressive”, etc…

          Teach her that our bodies should be covered -and kept- for the husband. That they are fearfully and wonderfully made, and designed for a specific purpose. That showing them off by wearing skimpy clothing is to puff up our own vanity. Face it, we see models getting attention when they show off their bodies, and by our sinful nature, we crave that same thing. It’s no wonder we see so much skin these days! It’s on the magazine covers, on television ads, on the Internet – everywhere. Satan has done a fine job to make us feel like that is normal and accepted dress. :(

          At the end of the day, our children are their own beings – our job is to train them up in the way they should go, but ultimately they are in the hands of a Creator who will either be pleased to allow their hearts to embrace His will or … Not. I’ve seen conservative pastor’s children embrace the feminist movement after they left the home. At that point we pray that they will return like the prodigal son!

          Sorry for being so wordy! :) I hope that helped at least a little!

        • Brenda

          Rhiannon, yes too often the women is blamed when it is not necessarily her fault. However, personally I believe most churched women have strayed far from biblical modesty. We have been encultrated to think we have the liberty to dress however we desire. I personally used to wear dresses I would cringe to be seen in now. My clothing styles have changed dramatically since beginning to cover, even though I was pretty conservative by modern standards. It is more like I now see the world through God’s eyes, not mine. I think it is beautiful that you are choosing to dress modestly and teach and train your children to do so as well. Let’s face it men and women are wired differently and like it or not, men to respond to what we wear. Does this mean that the men are not responsible for their actions? Absolutely not!!! Men are still responsible for irresponsible behavior. Does this mean we should wear whatever we desire to get heads turning and attention, I don’t believe so. However we need to be aware of how our dress does impact the men around us and be responsible to make it easier for them. Why do we want to parade what should be our husbands in public anyway?

      • FRE000

        Deborah,

        Actually, in countries where people are less obsessed with sex and where many beaches are clothing optional, nudity is not seen as erotic. In fact, someone with only the forbidden parts of the body barely covered is considered more erotic than someone who is completely nude.

        What is proper and what kind of female dress attracts men is dependent more on culture than it is inborn. For example, in American culture, the female breast is considered highly erotic whereas in many European countries it is not. Thus, women here in the U.S. feel uncomfortable breast feeding their infants in public whereas in many European countries it would scarcely be noticed.

        That said, I do not understand why women feel compelled to have their shoulders and cleavage exposed. I’m not saying that it is wrong, but it seems that in certain settings, women are actually made to feel uncomfortable if they choose to dress more modestly.

    • ferna485

      Thank you Rhiannon! I have long felt there is something shameful and/or sinful about femininity in today’s (Christian) culture (I know you stated you are not Christian, but this article is directed at Christians). Like you, I dress modestly, especially in societal terms.

      • Rhiannon

        YES. You aren’t imagining it, ferna485. I have Christian friends who have tried to tell me how much better off Israelite women were because of their rule under God. They had so many more “protections under God’s law” than the pagan nations round about.

        But, when I read that Israelite rape victims would be stoned if they were raped in town, but if they were raped in the country, they had to marry their rapists, I was appalled. This is a fundamental principle found ONLY in the patriarchal (i.e., Abrahamic) religions. Rape, in pagan cultures, was generally a capitol crime. The rapist was typically executed or, less frequently, castrated, and his belongings always went to the victim.

        I know many wonderful Christians and there are certainly some beautiful teachings in Christianity. But I could never be a Christian for two reasons:

        1. As a patriarchal religion, women are not as valued in Christianity. They are frequently taught that they must be subservient to husbands, that they are responsible for being a “stumbling block” to the men, etc., etc., rather than being valued for their unique strengths and abilities. So much of what makes a woman feminine or that allows her to delight in her femininity is denounced as somehow sinful and enticing. There is no true equality in the Abrahamic religions.

        2. The exclusive attitude that assumes that all other Christians who are not members of one’s particular denomination are ignorant at best, or, at worst, lost (along with all non-Christians). Case in point: my kids were playing with some friends one day when the oldest boy, 15, told my kids: “I can be friends with just about anybody. I can be friends with Catholics. I can be friends with Jews, Muslims, Hindus. But not pagans. I could never be friends with a pagan.”

        We live in a Catholic country. The boy and his family are…I’m sorry. I don’t know the English equivalent of the word. They’re evangélicos. They’re Christians, but they aren’t Catholic. Anyway, this boy obviously assumed we were Christian, and he was going on and on to my kids how he could be friends with anyone BUT NOT PAGANS, because pagans are so bad, so evil, and on and on.

        My kids just kind of looked at each other with big eyes and didn’t say anything. But it reinforced to them, never to tell anyone what our actual beliefs are, and it reinforced to me why I could never be a member of any group that had such an exclusive attitude and strong belief in their own rightness and superiority.

  • Ray Watters

    NO!!!

    • Kim

      Why not? It is what the Bible says?

  • Md.Zia-ul-Haque

    I request and call upon all the Christians to post/show the readers at least one photo of virgin Mary without a veil/hijab

    • Hi friend, all photos of Mary would be artist representations since no one knows what she looks like. We have no physical description of her. However, we know from first century literary evidence that all Jewish women covered themselves in the first century. So yes, she would have been covered.

  • Rebekah Applin Williams

    When you go to a country where Muslim is the majority, you will also find Christians wearing the same type of headdress. What then?

  • Brenda

    I guess I am not sure what side of this issue I fall on. I think there is not a right or wrong when it comes to style. I can see the point of not wearing something in a culture that will associate you with a faith that is not what you are representing, so it points to whom you really serve. I can imagine a article written for Islamic women might suggest that they not cover their heads with veils or mantilla’s traditionally worn by Christian women. At the same time, I think it is a conversation piece and certainly could lead to more discussions on faith then an uncovered Christian women in public who simply blends right in with the whole society, many of whom are atheists or agnostics. Most Christian women do not stand out from any other women walking down the street, and that is often short skirts or shorts etc. included. I think it takes bravery to cover in public because you are sort of a lone bird, and it is a conversation piece for sure. I know my clothing styles changed dramatically since covering, and I was pretty conservative at that previously. I think the key is obedience to the directive. As a Christian women who covers full time, with various types of coverings, hats, fascinators, scarves, headbands, I can say, my husband prefers I don’t wear the traditional Jewish or Muslim looks. He likes a scarf or a headband type. I think those styles are beautiful and can certainly say that in my church they would simply think I am legalistic for even following the directive at all full time or part time. I just noticed many changes since covering. I wouldn’t want to go back to being uncovered again. Let the world and the church misunderstand me, I get to experience the blessings of covering, and feel there has been a definite spiritual protection from doing so. I haven’t worn a hijab yet, or a full wrap or cover in public, but I notice my coverings getting larger and feel less conspicuous as time goes on.

    • Chantelle Monroe

      Brenda, true, it’s hard to say that there is a right or a wrong when it comes to style. There are a handful people at our church that practice headcovering of some kind, so it hasn’t really come up at church of anyone wondering what faith we are. It’s more outside of a church setting that I find you can get funny looks, or even funny questions.

      • Brenda

        Chantelle, It is good there are at least a handful of persons that practice head covering. Most places persons are lone rangers in their churches when they cover. Do you cover outside of church? I have been, but by and large not many persons have made comments.

        • Chantelle Monroe

          Brenda, I am indeed glad that a handful of others are practicing headcovering. It would for sure be more difficult if not for these brave women & girls. Do I cover outside of church? What my practice is; is that I just cover all day on Sunday, but not on other days. During the week I wear my regular clothes and am a contemporary 27-year old. On Sundays this year I have been fully immersing myself in keeping the Sabbath holy, and it has been an interesting journey… one sometimes full of questions from others. =)

          • Brenda

            Chantelle, Thanks for sharing your story. I have to say that watching some video’s from 119 ministries on you tube, changed many things for me. These three in particular…., , and then there is a part 2 but it says it is currently unavailable. Here too helped me to rethink the Sabbath. I want to get a book called the 10 commandments twice removed. For me in my walk, God wants me to fully engage with him all days of the week and reserve the Sabbath as a special day to further focus on him.

  • FRE000

    Because Muslim women face discrimination and harassment as the result of wearing the hijab, it would be a good idea for many Christian women to wear it to show solidarity with Muslim women and reduce the discrimination they face. It is entirely proper for us Christians to come to the aid of people of other religions. That doesn’t mean that we believe those religions, but loving and protecting our neighbors is a Christian thing to do.

    • Chantelle Monroe

      I suppose it’s kind of odd, but I had never met a Muslim woman until this year. We met at a promotional event called: World Hijab Day, where somehow I found myself sitting in her chair volunteering to try. I explained that I was Christian, and she had some unexpected responses.

    • Brenda

      I don’t feel called to wear a hijab to show solidarity with Muslim women. That may be a calling some feel called to, and if you are one of those, that is awesome. I do plan to participate on the world hijab day, where you wear it for a day to show solidarity. I think the day is in February. I want my head covering to be about following a command in scripture, not out of a social justice type reason.
      We certainly can love our Muslim neighbors without wearing the hijab. I do notice that wearing a head covering type of scarf covering where much of my hair, but not all of it is covered, does seem to draw Muslim women to me or allow an inroad to converse with them while shopping. Too often man can take God’s commands and then take it to a legalistic turn, only covering in one style, one color,and wanting to make it more law then the scripture adds to it.

      • Chantelle Monroe

        Brenda, I respect your points, and yes, scripture is more significant. We should do our best to love all our fellow humans, and this can be done in many other ways. World Hijab Day is February 1st. If you do participate, I’m curious on what your take will be. December 8th is Wear The Veil Day if you want to try a Mantilla.

        • Brenda

          I didn’t know there was a Wear the Veil Day, what is this in reference to? I will wear a Hijab and many of the scarves I have can be done hijab style and to be honest it is very comfortable and comforting when I wrap and look in the mirror. I don’t think my husband would be supportive of a hijab style wrap though he did go to market with me in a full scarf head wrap last weekend and said he felt ok about that. Interestingly, I really didn’t get many comments at all positive or negative. That is a really comfortable way to go too…hair out of the way, but definitely distinctive. Yes I’ll be participating in the World Hijab day. I just don’t feel like to care of others you have to dress like they dress. However if you are wanting to really reach out to a Muslim group of women, hijab style would likely be a great option.

    • nodumbsheep@gmail.com

      The LORD Jesus said, “Let your light so shine before men, that they may see your good works and glorify your Father in heaven.”
      Notice that the LORD very clearly explains in context that this is, “loving your enemy,” “doing good to those who hate you,” “give to him who asks of you,” “turn the other cheek”, etc… In American culture we have greatly err when we think that by our clothing (typical for us American’s to use our clothing as a FLAG we wave for our causes), our hairstyles, gym shoes, tattoos, or whatever else is in the fad of the moment that we are somehow “helping” unbelievers feel we love them. This is not biblical thinking. Headcoverings show the government of GOD. His order as spoken of in 1 Corinthians 11 and this is done to display our agreement with Him, the Kingdom of GOD and Jesus’ authority over us. This is upholding Colossians 1 in every way. But the love of GOD, the Gospel of His fulfilling the law for us, His death, burial and resurrection and His command to go into all the world and preach the good news that HE is completely sufficient to fulfill all righteousness…that is the Gospel the Christian must preach so men will call on the Name of Jesus for salvation. Be very careful of bringing any other identification into your life other than the person of the LORD Jesus. Every Christian has the blessing of being a “John the Baptist” and pointing the way to Jesus and Him alone.
      We need to stop this thinking that in order to reach people we have to dress like them and pick up mannerisms like them. As it says in Colossians, “Here there is neither jew nor gentile, barbarian, Scythian, slave, free but Christ is ALL and in ALL.” He is talking about the Body of Christ being of every tribe, tongue and nation. But this is not so with the unbeliever. They will be brought to Christ by the Gospel…not our identification with them on some issue of dress. Remember that to a muslim you will look like you want to submit to Allah who is a false god and they are obligated to do what they do or be greatly harmed within their own culture. In their culture the veil is an obligation and it is bondage. But Jesus said, “If the Son sets you free, you will be free INDEED.”
      His blood is sufficient to atone for our sin before the Father. We don’t come to the Father claiming the blood of Christ AND headcoverings…we come to the Father through Christ alone. Then we obey because of our love for Him and because we publically declare that He has the rightful place of rule. His Kingdom come and His will be done.
      So, knowing that it is by faith in Him alone, we then, BOLDLY live a godly life and as the apostle Peter clearly explains, “add to your faith goodness….brotherly kindness, love.” 2 Peter 1. This faith in Christ, acting out in the love of the brothers and sisters in the Body and then reaching out to do good to the nonbeliever in tangible ways of service is what we are to be doing, but identification with them is never taught in the Bible.
      Be holy, be gracious, practice hospitality, bring the Muslim to the Scriptures about Jesus and identify fully with him and they will know the truth that can set them free. Don’t make the mistake we’ve been making for years that made Christians UNCOVER. By following men, we err in many ways. Be very careful of this kind of philosophy…it is man centered and not Christ centered. It is reasonable, but not the power of the Gospel unto salvation.

      • CK

        In response to “nodumbsheep” who said, “Remember that to a muslim you will look like you want to submit to Allah who is a false god and they are obligated to do what they do or be greatly harmed within their own culture.”
        …..
        I was raised in a Christian family and converted to Islam as soon as God made me aware of its existence.

        Allah = the Arabic word for God.
        What you just said about Allah being a false God could be considered blasphemous. But you are unaware of the Arabic language so ask God to forgive you and He will forgive you. You didn’t know. He is the Most Forgiving, Most Merciful.

        We pray to the same God. Allah is the same God I used to talk to prior to finding Islam.

        And as for your comment about culture….

        I am Canadian-born. Other than our native tribes, we all came from other countries, and Canadians as a whole have no culture. Canadians follow the cultures of our immigrant ancestors. There also is no such thing as Canadian Values because we are so diverse. The only values we could define a Canadian by would be a definition given to us by the majority Christian whites in this country.
        If I have no culture…I live solely by my religion. And no man tells me to put on or take off (as some of the Muslim women I know actually experience today). I am free to choose here in Canada, and I choose to wear it.

        I apologize for not telling you this in person, as that is what Islam (Islam = Arabic word meaning to Submit to the One God) and it’s true values teaches me.

        Peace to all.

  • Suzy

    I don’t cover full-time (utmost respect for the 2 sweet Muslimas who belong to my gym and are always covered–but I just can’t 1) stand the heat and 2) keep it from slipping while working out). I ALWAYS cover in a holy place (church, synagogue, mosque, burial grounds, etc.) and usually cover when I’m just out and about in public. I personally prefer a tichel (Jewish style) in hotter months and a hijab in the colder months. I do not care if people assume I’m Muslim (I’m actually a modern-day Essene); I can’t control other people’s thoughts.

    • Brenda

      the no slip velvet headbands are helpful in not having the cover slip. I can see the advantage of wearing a cross with the hijab, but then again, I think there is more opportunity to converse with a diverse group of persons if you don’t have the cross and your head cover stimulates conversations.

  • Kim

    I began covering for the purpose of God and my Saudi fiance. He was the one to bring it to my attention that Christian women are told to cover. Ever since, I have felt closer to God, more than ever, and believe that to avoid confusion, you wear the cross over the hijab. It saves arguments and discrimination. The Western Christians should be embracing this. Just because “it was a different time” is not an excuse to not follow our Bible.

    • Chantelle Monroe

      What type of headcovering have you been using and with what frequency? What have the pro’s and con’s been thus far?

      • Kim

        I am using a hijab. I find it to be modest. I think I am closer to God now than ever. Some people may try to berate you. And it can get a little hot. But that relation with God is more important. And also it has riddened my Saudi of jealousy which is always nice haha.

        • Chantelle Monroe

          Kim, I agree that hijabs feel most modest, and I do find they help me focus and feel closer to God during prayer.

  • Isis Luartes

    I am a Catholic christian and I started to wear headscarf some time ago.. although I havent been consistent whuch makes me disappointed about myself.. I am starting again although it scares me because

  • Isis Luartes

    I am a Catholic christian and I started to wear headscarf some time ago.. although I havent been consistent which makes me disappointed about myself.. I am starting again although it scares me because the people around me even my family question what I do.. still I believe eventually they will understand.. I am gathering my strength to live a straight life and according to God.. I need help or encouragement from you ladies who also practice wearing headscarf even on a daily basis…

    • Chantelle Monroe

      Luna, support isn’t always easy to find. I offer you mine if you return the favor (smiles)?
      I don’t think that you have to be practicing consistently. Certain times and places call for different attire more than others. That is fair. In my case, family and church are for sure more accepting of headcovering, than friends and work.

      • Luna0206

        Thank you of course I will support! Ever since I started to cover myself I feel more secure and closer to God. When I read the Bible I cover myself as well. Hmm you have a point about not wearing all the time I wear only when I pray, worship, or read the Bible but soon I am planning to do it on a daily basis :) I just feel better knowing I do it for God and also I cover to save myself for the man I will marry <3

  • Hannah O.

    Hello! I came across this article doing my own personal research. First off, a bit about me:

    I was raised strict Pentecostal Holiness. Raised to dress modestly (skirts, dresses, long sleeves, no jewelry, no makeup, no hair cutting etc) but hair covering was never practiced in my home or church although we knew some people who did.

    For a while I left church and am now finding my way back to grace. My husband is Pentecostal Holiness and while I never stopped looking the part, I lost all conviction in my heart. I have since, rededicated my heart and life back to God and since then, I cannot get head covering out of my mind. I have been doing a lot of research about it, even practicing with scarves etc. Personally, I think I look hideous and I don’t have the face for it but it’s not about looks. It’s about obedience to God, following His word, and respect.

    I’ve felt this call to head covering often in my life, just always brushed it away. Now I feel it strongly more than ever. I’m afraid I can’t just brush it off this time.

    I was raised to look different, stand out, dress modest in a world that loves to glorify the flesh. I am ok with this. It’s how I was brought up, it’s a part of me. I still wear skirts and dresses and sadly I did cut my hair, but I haven’t cut it in almost a year now and I’m happy to say it’s growing back out!

    I have no qualms about going out in public with a head covering. I don’t mind the looks or stares for I know God smiles on me while others smirk. My concern is, how do I tell my family and even my husband that I have this call to head covering if that is indeed what it is? My family is strictly religious but yet they don’t think head covering is mandatory.

    Also, I wouldn’t mind wearing a hijab. I think it is beautiful. Modesty is beautiful. I love to see Muslim women in town. I remember once we went to the beach for Christmas and the hotel we were staying at was holding this family reunion of Muslims. There were probably 75-100 Muslims staying there that week. It was winter but the motel had indoor pools, hottubs, lazy rivers, etc. I remember that all of the women swam in full modest apparel including a hijab. I also remember feeling naked even though I had on a skirt and shirt to swim in. They were so dedicated and I found it beautiful. Now the men would swim in nothing but trunks which I felt wasnt fair because they showed off their bodies whereas the womem remained covered but like someone stated before, Muslim female Modesty is not practiced for reasons Christian women practice modesty.

    All in all, I’m just looking for advice. How to start head covering, how to approach he subject with my family and husband. Any advice is welcome. And please excuse any typos as my phone has a mind of its own and autocorrects :)

    • Cody Goldsbury

      Keep it simple and just tell them. You can send them this website in an e-mail: “You may have noticed something different about me and I’m about to tell you (1) what is and (2) why it’s important to me …”
      One thing though, if your family doesn’t accept it right away, give them as much time as they need to come around. They might not agree with what you believe about it, and that’s okay, there’s no rule that says that they have to agree with you fully. Earning their respect isn’t about making them agree with you, but showing them how much you love them even though you’re not on the same page on this subject.

    • Chantelle Monroe

      Hannah, You seem like a good person. I think it’s admirable how you are always conscious of self-improvement. Headcovering is a topic that is floating it’s way thru many Christian communities. Some people wonder: should we cover? and some even wonder CAN we cover? What I love about the headcovering movement is that it’s mostly being driven by teens and young women, eager to put their own spin on faith. I admire their passion.

      Since headcovering is experiencing a re-birth, there really aren’t much for set guidelines. You will have to explore what works for you. As far as how to start, the Catholic faith has a “wear the veil day” in December, and the Islamic faith has a “world hijab day” in February that you could join in with others. Since it’s a personal choice between you and God, I recommend just covering when you are by yourself, around the house or wherever. You will be free from outside judgment to pray and see how you feel.

      From there you can either go all-in and just put it on one day and wear it to church and let the judging begin =) or you can work one friend/family member at at time broaching the subject conversationally and start with the most open minded person.

      For the record, hijabs are wonderful to wear, just come with baggage/judgement 😉

  • UsernameBlankNow

    I suggest having a look at a multitude of women in different countries. Hijab in Iran isn’t the same as hijab in Asia or the UK. Cover your hair or your head as the Lord leads you and quit worrying about how it looks to others.

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